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FAE OR FOE? THE CRACKLOCK SAGA BY C A DEEGAN

FAE OR FOE? BY C A DEEGAN

Absorbingly intriguing; it reads like a movie.

“I don’t know about what Matthew said, as I used to skive off of Sunday school. But I do remember that bit that says, ‘Thou shalt not allow a witch to live.'” An excerpt from page 278.

Craig Deegan’s Fae or Foe? The Cracklock Saga is an enthralling book that held me captive until I finish indulging my relatable emotions in it. It’s action-packed, emotional, hilarious, and absorbingly captivating.

This book detailed the life of the protagonist, Jack Crackley, following on from his family history, his job, and his studies. Jack, from onset had no idea that he has some inborn abilities, this feature was first discovered by Mr. Binks – who had falsely invited Jack to his house to help him with some job, what happened eventually was mysteriously unexpected, old Binks had drug Jack – of which its effect had him feeling unconscious and hallucinating. Jack fought and had to break loose from Binks. Binks’s initial kind appearance has suddenly changed to that of a vicious demon. Jack was terrified at this, he tried hard to escape from him, and this leads him to have a severe accident that eventually result to his loss of sight.

Jimmy, another interesting character had grown friendship with Jack when he had saved him from the troublesome LaFey twins. Jimmy’s characterization is an interesting one, one of which intrigues me most was his loquaciousness. He had developed a friendship with Jimmy, and frequently visit him when he heard about his accident. Jack’s accident had his mother, Sammy called for the attention of her aunt, Elsie to look over Jack while she works. Aunt Elsie’s arrival took Jack on an adventure into the realm of the faeries, where he was grounded with his family history, and the sort of person he was. While these were going on, they had a feeling that Anastasia was desperately seeking for Jack, for some bad reason, I suggest.

Anastasia and his silly boy, Benedict set on the journey, they luckily found the silly LaFey twins through which they had instigate them about locating Jack’s house. The LaFeys took it on because the pay was handsome, they’d silently followed Jimmy after school while on his way to Jack’s house. After they’d found what they want, they still took pleasure in torturing Jimmy. Kind Fae, Dorcas couldn’t help watch Jimmy endure excruciating pain from the hands of the heartless twins, she gave them a well-deserved beating, they were stunned that they were attacked by an invisible fighter – that they had to flee to report back to Anastasia. It later dawn on Dorcas that she had just implicated herself, and that was where the whole thing began to escalate.

The Faery law govern the Fae folks – they had medicine, glamour, and other sorts of things. On a fateful day, Anastasia arrived at Jack’s house, she was met by his mother, Sammy. Poor Sammy had no idea of what had been going on in her house for a while, and Anastasia’s august visit came to her as a shock. She was tortured alongside Dorcas by Anastasia who demanded the whereabouts of Jack. This part is full of action and it seem my best part of the novel. The instance whereby, Elsie eventually appears to assist Dorcas and Sammy was enthralling, the exchange of glamour and the magical fight between Anastasia and Aunt Elsie was captivating. I love the description of this part and in my opinion, it added more charm to the book. I would love to say that Craig did a great job at describing every action, move, and indulgence of every character here, it feels so raw – in a way that I could paint the image in my head, making it read like a movie.

I shall restrict from revealing further as an attempt to keep this review spoiler-free, though, I’d love to say that I am fascinated with Craig’s storytelling techniques. Undoubtedly, he is a talented novelist whose words have the power to pull a reader in, and engrossed until the last page has been read. The novel is brilliantly written, the transition was amazing, the plot twist, and the characterization were dynamically awesome. I am short of words on how well to describe Craig’s adeptness, however, I’d love to say that this book deserves some award. Reading it made me fell in love with some characters, and I desperately hate some, many of which have me feeling emotional, tensed, and craving for the second book series.

This book is a perfect literary work, and I am sure to refer to it in future time. The vocabulary is very extensive; I found myself laughing and nodding my head at the crafting of each chapters. It’s one of those books that I’ve acquired “writing knowledge and style” many of which I’d love to make reference to, in future time. There is more to this book than I’ve described and I’d love to recommend this book to lovers of fantasy, mythology, fairy tales, and literature at large.

Book Title: Fae or Foe? The Cracklock Saga
Page Count 335 pages
Book Purchase link: https://www.amazon.com/Book-Fae-Foe-Cracklock-Saga/dp/1739908104
Authored by Craig Deegan
Reviewed by Peter Okonkwo (Host of P. English Literature)

Published by Peter Okonkwo

Peter Okonkwo was born in Akure, a city in the South-Western part of Nigeria. He is a fatalistic writer, author, editor, entrepreneur, poet, soon-to-be novelist of Etean's Destiny; and a certified orator from the Friendship Leadership Institute of Nigeria. Peter is the author of three poetry collections: Ecstasy of the Dead; Fate, In the Dungeon of Doom, and Whose Fault, Kismet or Impediment? His works have been surveyed as one that runs a gamut of emotion, religion undercurrents, the afterlife, mysteries of the human fate - occasionally coming across a quite wistful, melancholy, and in other instances very positive, and thought-provoking sort of anthologies. Peter is the host of the "P. English Literature" YouTube channel where he review books and conducts interviews with authors around the world.

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